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Category: Flower Farming

August 2018 – Zinnias

There is no denying it has been hot and while many plants are struggling some are thriving – Zinnias.

I certainly spend a lot of time watering. It’s time consuming as there is so much to do but it has to be done carefully too. The ground is so dry that water drains away from the plant if you water too quickly. When planting I try to make a shallow depression around a plant so water will drain towards it rather than away. It is best to use a rose on your watering can,  as it sprinkles water gently without disturbing the soil around the roots. I pour on a small amount, let it soak in and then gradually add more. The rule is give what you think is enough and then some more.

The poly tunnel is full to bursting just now. There is also a rogue at the centre which grew itself.

An amaranthus getting too big for it’s boots. It will have to come out.

The Zinnias are loving the heat and thriving. I love this little gentle pink one:

Some of the colours are not so gentle:

I’m not sure about that pink…

This one is unusual but the combination is very pretty:

But for me the real star is ‘Queen Red Lime’:

They look great in bouquets and last for ages in water.

July 2018

I wasn’t sure I would ever show this picture.

This was how we started early in the year. Now that buckets of blooms have been  harvested from here I can show it.

We removed the turf and dug it over. I follow the ‘no-dig’ method of gardening but it was necessary to dig over to begin with to remove weeds and loosen the soil which had been compacted. This bed is now divided in two with a path up the middle.

Seedlings went in and, as usual, I wondered how these tiny things would ever produce flowers.

Many of them are now waist high and flowering their hearts out.

Here are a few current highlights.

Ammi majus

 

Cosmos ‘Cupcakes’

 

Dahlia ‘Cafe au Lait’

The challenging year goes on but the rewards are enormous and I love being able to work here every day.

A new Flower Farm

Perhaps I picked the wrong year to start a Flower Farm. We had snow twice in March which is very rare here then very cold and wet weather in April followed by a mini heatwave then back to the cold. It is generally agreed amongst growers that we are 3-4 weeks behind a normal year. Whatever that is! Added to that we had a frost on the 1st of May.

The bit of warmth and sunshine we had was welcomed by the plants (and humans) and everything burst into life at the end of April. Things are moving so fast it is hard to keep up. It is a great joy after the long, grey winter.

I’m in Somerset and extremely privileged to have approximately 1 acre of land. It’s by  no means all cultivated for flower farming, I’m starting with what I hope is a manageable but productive area to add to my existing cutting beds, vegetable garden and poly tunnel.